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25 Flowers Similar to Bleeding Hearts

25-flowers-similar-to-bleeding-hearts

We’ve gathered 25 attractive flowers similar to bleeding hearts. Its pendulous blossoms with graceful arching stems make it stand out in ornamental gardens. Here are more flowers that posses the same characteristics and are also great companions.

Bleeding hearts belong to Dicentra genus and are scientifically known as Lamprocapnos spectabilis. Bleeding hearts are herbaceous perennials native to eastern Asia and North America. They grow in hardy zones of 3-9 and are 6 inches to 3 feet tall and 1-3 feet wide when mature.

Bleeding hearts have attractive divided leaves with loose branching clusters of delicate, heart-shaped flowers dangling on their stem. Bleeding hearts bloom for 4-6 weeks in mid-to-late spring and are shades of pink, red, or white.

The ideal temperature for bleeding hearts is 55°F-75°F. Bleeding hearts thrive in part shade and prefer humus-rich, moist soil infused with organic matter. Bleeding hearts like soil that is well-draining and constantly moist keep bleeding hearts well-watered.

Bleeding hearts are used for ornamental purposes.

Table of Contents

Squirrel Corn

Native to eastern North America, Squirrel Corn (Dicentra canadensis) is an herbaceous perennial with a hardiness zone of 4-7. Squirrel Corn grows 6-12 inches tall.

Squirrel corn is a spring ephemeral, grown for its beautiful booms. Squirrel corn has lavish, blue-green to grayish-green finely divided leaves. In mid to late spring, squirrel corn has graceful arching stems embellished with inflorescences of fragrant, pinkish-white heart-shaped flowers dangling above the foliage.

Squirrel corn has a lot of similarities to bleeding hearts. Squirrel corn has a similar bloom to bleeding hearts, and squirrel corn also prefers partial shade to full shade and grows in rich, well-drained, moist soil. Squirrel corn also prefers constantly moist soil.

However, squirrel corn has different foliage and uses to bleeding hearts.

Squirrel corn is used as a tonic and diuretic and in the treatment of syphilis.

Blue Corydalis

Corydalis flexuosa is commonly known as blue corydalis. Blue corydalis is a rhizomatous perennial native to China. Blue corydalis is hardy to zones 5-8 and grows 10-12 inches tall and 8-12 inches wide.

Blue corydalis has finely divided, lacy green leaves with slender upright stems. In mid-spring, distinctive, long-spurred, tubular bright blue flowers dangle above its foliage. Each stem of the blue corydalis can have up to 10 flowers.

Blue corydalis resembles bleeding hearts, but their blooms are blue.

Blue corydalis thrives in part to full shade. It also has similar soil, and water needs to bleeding hearts (well-drained and humus-rich soil, with average watering).

Corydalis is used for dozens of chest pains, abdominal pain, spasms, blood stimulation, and circulation.

Lungwort

Lungwort belongs to the Pulmonaria spp. Genus. Lungwort is an herbaceous perennial native to Europe and Asia. Lungwort is hardy to zones 4-8 and grows 6-12 inches tall and 12-18 inches wide.

Lungwort is a clump-forming, semi-evergreen perennial. Lungwort has large, lung-shaped, dark green leaves adorned with splashes of silver and fine fuzzy hairs. In spring, lungwort presents panicles of large, outward-facing pink flowers that mature into violet-blue.

Lungwort thrives in temperatures of 60°F-65°F and prefers shaded areas. Lungwort grows best in organically rich, humus soil, with a moderate amount of water to keep the soil constantly moist.

Lungwort and bleeding hearts have similar sun, water, and soil requirements.

Lungwort is used to treat breathing conditions, urinary tract problems, and intestinal ailments.

Hosta

Hosta spp. is a popular herbaceous perennial native to China, Japan, Korea, and Russia. Hosta is simple to grow. They are hardy to zones 3-9 and grows to 6-48 inches tall and up to 6 feet wide.

Hosta is clump-forming perennials adored for their foliage. The Hosta’s foliage is long and sword-like to large and round with corrugated textures, and the leaves vary from green to deep blue-green with chartreuse yellow centers. Hosta has long stalks producing white, lavender, or pink blooms in late spring.

Hosta can survive in full shade but does best in a few hours of dappled sun each day. Hosta likes rich and fertile soil that is well-draining. Like bleeding hearts, Hosta needs soil that is constantly moist but not wet.

Hosta is an edible plant used in Japanese cuisine.

Snowdrop Anemone

Anemone sylvestris. is an herbaceous perennial native to North America. Snowdrop anemone is hardy to zones 3-8 and grows 18 inches tall.

Snowdrop anemone is a cherished late spring bloomer. Dainty, bell-shaped, white flowers with prominent gold stamens are individually toted on bare stems atop finely cut green foliage.

Snowdrop anemone is grown in part shade or full shade; and prefers rich, moist, and well-draining soil, making it similar to bleeding hearts. Snowdrop anemone thrives in temperatures of 58°F-65°F and needs average watering for optimal blooms.

Snowdrop anemone is used as a floral groundcover.

Cineraria

Pericallis cruenta is a buyout daisy-like flower in the Asteraceae family, commonly known as cineraria. Cineraria is a tender, spring-blooming perennial native to the Azores and the Canary Islands. Cineraria is hardy to zones 9-11 and grows up to 5 feet tall.

Cineraria is valued for its long-lasting blooms and wide array of colors. Cineraria has star-shaped flowers in zesty single or bi-colors of white, bright pink, blood orange, red, magenta, and royal blue.

Cineraria thrives in temperatures of 50°F-65°F.

Cineraria should be planted in rich, moist, and well-draining soil in areas with partial shade or full shade. Cineraria thrives when regularly watered; keep the soil moist but not too wet.  Cineraria has similar sun, water, and soil requirements as bleeding hearts.

Cineraria is used as a topical treatment to treat cataracts.

Coral Bells

Heuchera is a genus of evergreen perennials in the family Saxifragaceae, and are native to North America. Coral bells have a hardiness zone of 4-8. Coral bells are 8-18 inches tall and 12-24 inches wide when mature.

Coral bells form woody crowns at their base with round, lobed, hairy leaves in an array of lime green, dark green, gold, mauve, or plum-burgundy leaves. In late spring, clusters of petite, bell-shaped flowers are adorned on tall stems, ranging in white, pink, coral, and red colors.

Coral bells thrive in temperatures of 73°F-84°F.

Coral bells look very different from bleeding hearts, but they are similar to bleeding hearts in four ways. First, they have identical sun, water, and soil requirements, and they have similar uses. Both plants thrive in part shade and prefer humus-rich, moist soil infused with organic matter. Both plants like soil that is well-draining and constantly moist, and both need to be well-watered.

Coral bells are used for ornamental purposes.

Meadow Rue

Thalictrum rochebruneanum is a flowering perennial native to Japan. Meadow rue grows in hardy zones of 4-9 and grows 4-6 feet tall and 1-4 feet wide.

Meadow rue is cherished for its lacy bluish-green to chartreuse foliage and its wispy open inflorescences of nodding lilac flowers with prominent yellow centers.

Meadow rue prefers partially shaded areas. Meadow rue grows best in well-drained, rich humus soil, with a moderate amount of watering, ensuring that the soil is constantly moist.

Meadow rue and bleeding heart have similar sun, water, and soil requirements.

An infusion of meadow rue’s leaves is used to treat fevers.

Impatiens

Impatiens spp. are tender perennial flowers native to Africa, Eurasia, and New Guinea. Impatiens are tropical perennials that can be grown as annuals if the temperatures aren’t too hot (zones 10-12). Impatiens grow in hardy zones of 2-11 and grows 6-36 inches tall and 1-3 feet wide.

Impatiens have long, dark green leaves with beautiful contrasting blooms. In addition, impatiens have irregularly shaped blooms that may be solitary or in small clusters. These darling blooms come in white, red, pink, coral, violet, purple, and yellow colors.

Impatiens thrive in temperatures of 50°F-70°F.

Impatiens should be planted in rich and well-draining soil and areas with partial shade or full shade. Impatiens thrive when regularly watered. Impatiens have similar sun, water, and soil requirements as bleeding hearts.

Impatiens have been used to treat skin ailments and stinging nettle rashes, and poison ivy toxicity.

Shooting Star

The shooting star (Dodecatheon meadia) is an herbaceous perennial native to the Midwestern, Northeastern, and Southeastern United States. This beloved wildflower is hardy to zones 4-8 and grows 1-3 feet tall.

From each basal rosette of lance-shaped leaves come about 1-4 leafless flowers scapes. Atop each scape, the shooting star boasts 8-20 nodding umbels. Each flower has 5 swept-back petals and a cluster of bright yellow stamens that resemble wind-blown umbrellas. Once fertilized, the flowers turn upwards, giving them their famous name. These late-spring bloomers range in colors of white, pink, and light purple.

Shooting stars and bleeding hearts have similar blooms and thrive in partial shade and well-drained soil. However, the shooting star prefers loamy soil. Shooting stars thrive in mild spring temperatures and need average water.

Shooting stars were used as a wash for sore eyes, but they are known and enjoyed for their unusual beauty.

Primrose

Primula vulgaris is a short-lived perennial native to western and southern Europe, northwest Africa, and southwest Asia. Primrose is hardy to zones 4-8 and grows 6-20 inches tall and 8-20 inches wide.

Primrose is semi-evergreen, rosette-forming perennial with ovate, toothed, deep green leaves. From early to mid-spring, the primrose bears masses of pale yellow flowers.

Primrose thrives in temperatures of 50°F-70°F and prefers partially shaded areas. Primrose grows best in organically rich, humus soil, with a moderate amount of water to keep the soil consistently moist.

Primrose and bleeding hearts have similar sun, water, and soil requirements.

Primrose flowers are used in desserts and confections, whereas the roots are infused to treat headaches.

Bloodroot

Sanguinaria canadensis is a rhizomatous perennial native to the Eastern United States and Eastern Canada. Bloodroot is hardy to zones 3-8 and grows 5-12 inches tall and 10 inches wide.

Bloodroot is named for the dark red sap in the stem and leaves. In spring, the bloodroots boast solitary white flowers enhanced with showy yellow stamens. Bloodroots have 8-16 symmetrically arranged petals that unfurl in the sun and button up on cloudy days.

Bloodroots are different in appearance from bleeding hearts, but they have other similarities. Bloodroots thrive in part shade to full shade and prefer humus-rich, moist soil, similar to bleeding hearts. Bloodroot and bleeding hearts like soil that is well-draining and constantly moist; keep them well-watered.

Bloodroot is often used as a topical or oral antibacterial agent.

Fuchsia

Fuchsia is an evergreen shrub native to the Caribbean and northern South America. Fuchsia is hardy to zones 10-11 and mature to 1-2 feet tall.

Fuchsia has tiny, handsome golden to green foliage. Fuchsia produced beautiful pendant blossoms that mature into flowers with slender cerise tubes and reddish-violet petals.

Fuchsia has a relatively similar flower shape and color to bleeding hearts. Fuchsia is grown in part shade or full shade; and prefers rich, moist, and well-draining soil, making it similar to bleeding hearts. However, fuchsia thrives in rich, moist soil with a peat-based mix. Fuchsia grows best in temperatures of 55°F-80°F and needs average watering for optimal blooms.

Fuchsia is an ornamental flower, giving it a similar purpose to bleeding hearts.

Dutchman’s Breeches

Dicentra cucullaria is an herbaceous perennial known as Dutchman’s breeches. Dutchman’s breeches are native to North America. It has a hardy zone of 3-7 and grows 6-12 inches tall and 6-12 inches wide.

Dutchman’s breeches have beautiful lacy finely cut blue-green foliage. Then, in mid-to-late spring, pure white or pink, old-fashioned pantaloon-shaped flowers form on gracefully arching stems.

Dutchman’s breeches prefer to be planted in part-to-full-shaded areas. Dutchman’s breeches grow best in a temperature of approximately 60°F, and in well-draining, humus soil, with medium moisture. Dutchman’s breeches need a moderate amount of watering to ensure the soil is moistened once slightly dry.

Dutchman’s breeches have a similar flower shape to bleeding hearts, but their most apparent similarities are their sun, water, and soil needs.

Dutchman’s breeches are used to treat skin conditions such as syphilis.

Wax Begonias

Begonia semperflorens-Coltorum is an annual or warm-weather perennial native to Central and South America. Wax begonia has a hardiness zone of 10-11 and grows 6-18 inches tall and 6-12 inches wide.

Wax begonias adored tiny flowers. Wax begonias have waxy, deep green, bronze, or maroon mounds of foliage with delicate white, pink, or red flowers that bloom during summer.

Wax begonias thrive in temperatures above 60°F and prefer dappled sunlight. Wax begonias like rich, moist, and well-draining soil. Like bleeding hearts, Hosta needs soil that is constantly moist but not wet.

Wax begonias are used for ornamental purposes, similar to bleeding hearts.

Dogtooth Violet

Erythronium albidum is an herbaceous perennial known as the dogtooth violet or trout lily. The dogtooth violet is native to Europe and grows 6-12 inches tall. The dogtooth violet has a hardiness zone of 4-9.

Dogtooth violet has glossy, deep-green foliage mottled with bronze spots. In spring, dainty, pale purple, or creamy yellow flowers with recurved petals appear on nodding stems. The dogtooth violet has bulbs resembling the shape of a dog’s tooth, giving the plant its famous name.

Dogtooth violet thrives in full shade or dappled sunlight. Dogtooth violet plants like humus-rich and fertile, well-draining soil. Dogtooth violets need soil that is constantly moist but not wet.

Dogtooth violets and bleeding hearts have similar soil and water requirements.

Dogtooth violets have used a source of starch and are used as a vegetable.

Hellebore

Helleborus spp. belongs to the Ranunculaceae family. Hellebore is an herbaceous perennial native to Caucasus and Turkey. Hellebore is hardy to zones 3-9 and grows 1-2 feet tall and 1-2 feet wide.

Hellebore has evergreen lobed foliage with prominent pink veins which gradually mature into a creamy color. In spring, hellebore stems shoot up above its foliage with face-down blooming flowers. Blooms are mostly white with pink or green tinting, but they come in pink, purple, and yellow shades.

Hellebore is quickly grown in humus-rich and moist soil, with full shade or partial shade. Hellebore requires a moderate amount of water; ensure that the soil is moist, not soggy, and wet.

Hellebore has similar sun, water, and soil requirements to bleeding hearts.

Hellebore is used to detoxify the body, reduce fevers, treat spasms, and stimulate menstruation.

Daffodil

Narcissus is a bulbous perennial also known as daffodils. Daffodils are native to Europe and Africa and grow 12-18 inches tall and 6-12 inches wide. Daffodils grow in hardy zones of 3-9.

Daffodils have deep green linear leaves and stem adorned with frilly cup-shaped blooms in yellow, white, orange, and red colors. Daffodils grace us with their flowers from mid to late spring.

Daffodils typically grow in temperatures between 60°F-70°F. Daffodils thrive in partial shade and in rich, moist soil that has to be well-draining. Daffodils require regular watering during springtime, but once daffodils stop blooming, they need less water.

Daffodils and bleeding hearts share the same hardy zones and have similar water and sun requirements.

Daffodils are used to treat wounds, common colds, inflammation, and bronchitis.

English Daisy

English daisy (Bellis perennis) is a perennial grown as a biennial that is native to Europe. English daisy grows in hardy zones of 4-8 and grows 6-12 inches tall and 6-12 inches wide.

English daisy has spoon-shaped dark green leaves with tightly clustered flower petals resembling pompons that bloom during spring. English daisies are red, white, or pink.

English daisies require rich, loamy, and well-draining soil and thrive in partially shaded areas, with approximately 4-6 hours of sunlight per day. English daisies and bleeding hearts have similar water requirements, and they need regular watering to bloom and survive.

English daisies are edible flowers that can be used in salads. English daisies have also been used to treat menstrual cramps and urinary tract inflammation.

Freesia

Freesia spp. is a perennial bulb or corm often grown as an annual. Freesia is native to Africa and has a hardiness zone of 9-10. Freesia grows 1-2 feet tall.

Freesia has narrow, grass-like foliage with scented, double flowers that bloom inflorescences upon wiry, leafless stems in arrays of white, pink, purple, red, yellow, orange, and blue. Freesias display their charming blooms from spring to summer.

Freesia typically grows in temperatures of 60°F-70°F. Freesia thrives in full sun to partial shade and needs rich, moist, well-draining soil. Freesia has similar water needs to bleeding hearts; they need a moderate amount of water to thrive.

Freesias are mainly used in wedding bouquets, but they are also used in creams and candles due to their pleasant scent.

Greek Valerian

Polemonium caeruleum, is a clump-forming perennial native to Northern Asia and Europe. Greek valerian is hardy to zones 4-9 and grows between 12-24 inches tall and 12-24 inches wide.

Greek valerian has pinnate, green leaves. In mid to late spring, Greek valerian blooms panicles of cup-shaped flowers in a gorgeous array of lavender, blue, or white atop thin, long stems.

Greek valerian has delicate foliage that prefers part to full shaded areas. They thrive in loose, rich, and well-drained soil. Water Greek valerian moderately to keep their blooms lush.

Greek valerian and bleeding hearts have similar sun and water requirements.

Greek valerian roots are used to treat coughs, bronchitis, fevers, and inflammation.

Monkshood

Aconitum napellus is a tall, herbaceous perennial native to Europe and Asia. Monkshood is hardy to zones 3-9 and grows 2-4 feet tall and 1-2 feet wide.

Monkshood is a summer bloomer that features smooth, palmate foliage and densely packed racemes of deep purplish-blue or white hood-shaped flowers.

Monkshood thrives best in dappled sunlight or partially shaded areas. Monkshood prefers moist and well-drained soil. Monkshood likes consistently moist soil but not waterlogged, giving it similar water requirements to bleeding hearts.

Monkshood is used for ornamental purposes, similar to bleeding hearts.

Crocosmia

Crocosmia spp. is a tall perennial bulb native to South Africa. Crocosmia grows in hardy zones of 5-9 and grows 2-4 feet tall.

Crocosmia has long, bright green, erect foliage. Crocosmia is a summer bloomer that showcases brilliant arrays of large, front-facing blooms in bright yellow or orange with a crimson-red eye.

Crocosmia typically grows in temperatures of 70°F-75°F, exposed to full or partial sun. Crocosmia is easily grown in humus-rich, moist, and well-draining soil. Crocosmia needs regular watering but should not be left waterlogged.

Crocosmia and bleeding hearts have similar soil and water requirements.

Crocosmia flowers are used to produce an edible yellow dye. East Africans also use the leaf sap and corms of crocosmia to treat malaria.

Purple Bell Vine

Rhodochiton atrosanguineus is a tender, perennial climber native to Mexico. Purple bell vine has a hardy zone of 9-10 and grows up to 10 feet tall.

Purple bell vine is a summer to fall bloomer known for its pale green, heart-shaped foliage, adorned with purple lining and its exquisite, drooping purplish-black pendant flowers.

The ideal temperature for purple bell vine is 65°F-75°F and thrives in full sun. Purple bell vine prefers humus-rich, moist soil. Purple bell vine likes soil that is well-draining and constantly moist; keep purple bell vine well-watered.

Purple bell vine and bleeding hearts have similar bloom and water requirements.

Purple bell vine is used for ornamental purposes, similar to bleeding hearts.

Snapdragon

Antirrhinum majus is a short-lived perennial usually grown as annuals. Snapdragon is native to Mediterranean Europe, Syria, and Turkey. Snapdragon is hardy to zones 7-11 and grows 6-48 inches tall, depending on the variety.

Snapdragon is commonly planted for its long-lasting blooms. From spring to fall, snapdragons are adored for their snout-shaped flowers, resembling a dragon’s snout. Snapdragon blooms are fragrant and come in various colors like white, yellow, pink, orange, red, purple, and violet.

Snapdragon prefers temperatures of 70°F-75°F as well as full sun to part shade. Snapdragons thrive in rich, moist, and well-draining soil types.

Snapdragons need moderate amounts of water. Be sure to avoid overhead watering. Snapdragons and bleeding hearts require a moderate amount of watering. They also have similar soil requirements (rich and well-draining).

Snapdragon plants have been used to treat inflammation as well as skin tumors and ulcers.

References:

Gardenia

live-native.com – a better natural, green way of living

Go Botany: Native Plant Trust

Best Garden Info

The Spruce – Make Your Best Home

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